State comes up a little short on budget: $6 billion

What are government budgets without political grandstanding, passing blame, and abdication of responsibility?

As of March 1, new rules for shoppers are in the bag

Winter’s barren branches are never truly empty as chill winds howl. Gone are the gentle, rustling leaves filtering soft green light upon the lawns (or concrete) below. But the Bronx instead has the tattered, flapping, tree-dwelling shopping bag to grace the otherwise arboreal wasteland.

Old guard keeps hold on reins at Dem club

Michael Heller won another term as president of the Benjamin Franklin Reform Democratic Club, but not before welcoming what Assemblyman Jeffrey Dinowitz later noted was the “largest turnout” in the club’s 60-year history, “and probably the largest turnout in many years of any political club.”

Straphangers get ready to say good-bye to 'Train Daddy'

Subways have arrived just a little faster over the last two years, and those trains have carried more passengers. New projects were developed, as was a different approach to getting people around, even if some — like the Bronx bus redesign — have met with mixed reactions from riders.

Despite protests, Waldo Ave project nears start

Timber Equities is about to go 2-for-2 when it comes to getting controversial construction projects out of the ground. Just weeks after clearing some of the final hurdles with the city’s building department to raze Villa Rosa Bonheur on Spuyten Duyvil’s Palisade Avenue, the developer with a Fieldston connection now has a green light to move forward with another apartment project at 3893 Waldo Ave.

BETTER LIVING

Harelick fires up not only ceramics, but young creativity

Dan Harelick arrived home from his job as design director for an advertising agency, and realized a total creative hole in his being. At 45, he was content, but not happy. Nor fulfilled.

SPORTS

Science routs nemesis Mott Haven in wild ‘West’ show

Bronx Science’s victory over KIPP last Thursday was barely in the books, but Sarang West was already looking ahead.

Taking a stand for mental health on MLK Day

It was the federal holiday set aside to honor civil rights activist Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. But Hawk Newsome isn’t too fond of how this beacon of hope is remembered.

New tech provides new possibilities

There’s more to the Hebrew Home at Riverdale than just an assisted living facility. There is, of course, its popular art and history museum, an aviary, a shelter for abused senior citizens, and to the surprise of some, a high school.

Water will return

DEP reverses Jerome Park Reservoir plan — for now

Squeaky wheels get the grease, as the saying goes — or, in this case, water. After months of challenging the city’s environmental protection department over plans to keep Jerome Park Reservoir’s north basin dry indefinitely, its 50,000-odd neighbors got the news they’d been hoping for: the DEP will keep water in the basin.

GREEN SCENE

The ancient organisms that lived beneath ancient trees

In that faraway time when Eospermatopteris and Archaeopteris were growing mere miles from Riverdale, there were many other critters living in the same neighborhood.

Dinowitz will try, try again for a consumer advocate

Costs of living in New York City are high, and that’s no secret. Rent is expensive. Groceries are expensive. Taxes are expensive.

Sports

More

Obituaries

More

Police Beat

More

POLITICAL ARENA

Engel proud enemy of Citizens United

If there’s anyone fighting to end how political money is raised through the decade-old U.S. Supreme Court decision known as Citizens United, it’s U.S. Rep. Eliot Engel.