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Assuming protests and some of the violence that trailed in its wake doesn’t mess anything up, New York City is expected to finally jumpstart its stalled economy on Monday, June 8. But as the city catches up to the state’s nine other regions on the road to recovery, there are still many unanswered questions that abound — especially surrounding some of the unique needs of small businesses.  more
The coronavirus pandemic has confined many to their homes. But it’s no secret how small New York City homes can get, so finding ways to stretch their legs with some physical fitness isn’t easy — especially with gyms closed and it being difficult to breathe hard with a mask on their faces. more
It’s always good to see a familiar, friendly face, especially in times of trouble. Of course, nowadays, it may be difficult and indeed dangerous to greet someone face-to-face. Using the online videoconferencing app Zoom has helped businesses, friends and families commune without risk. Other apps have helped galleries and museums bring art — familiar and new — to as many homes as possible.  more
For Chris Fink, there isn’t a lot that matters to him more than climate change. And running to represent New York’s 16th Congressional District isn’t changing that. Even when Fink talks about any other issue, it doesn’t take long at all before he finds a connection to the climate. more
And just like that, it was gone. It was only a few weeks ago that news broke of plans by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Federal Emergency Management Agency to build a 200-bed field hospital in Van Cortlandt Park. more
Spring has sprung, but the parks are empty. The gardens seem abandoned. Trees — whose branches have begun to bloom deep in Spuyten Duyvil Shorefront Park — remain unseen and unappreciated. more
When Moss Cafe shut down March 17, Emily Weisberg was left wondering what to do next. The Johnson Avenue hotspot for farm-to-table kosher and vegetarian fare wasn’t spared from the mass closings of many New York City eateries. The ones who could stay open were forced to shift to delivery or curbside takeout. more
In the best of times and the worst of times, pizza prevails. That doughy disc drenched in tomato sauce under a warm cheese blanket and sundry toppings is an explicit promise of culinary relief, especially when supermarket shelves are occasionally empty. more
Ridership on trains — especially Metro-North trains — has dropped as much as 95 percent since the advent of the coronavirus pandemic. Among those having to abandon the rails and stay home is Muriel Kessler, who depends on the train from the Riverdale station into her law office in Manhattan. more
A city council meeting is probably the last place someone would expect to see a child. But for Councilman Andrew Cohen, his colleagues and parents across the country, these periodic drop-ins by their young children walking into a room where their father or mother is connected virtually to the rest of the city’s government are part of the new normal. more
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